Winter 1980 • Vol. II No. 1 Fiction |

Roos and the Cities

Translated from the Portuguese.   The rhythm of the life and the bells of Eltville (there Anneliese Roos is born and there her people live) reverberates in everything she does: in her walk, her gestures, her speech. The language of Racine, which she uses in a literary way, dignified and even elaborate, with a pronunciation in which preciseness might be the only fault, acquires, interposed between different tongues—the languages which each of us brings from our countries of origin and which the other does not speak—a magical and benevolent meaning: we, without it, are two mutes. The ways it opens for us, however, are limiting and more for me than for Roos: rarely, and perhaps never, can I express exactly what I am struggling to tell her. In this way, in spite of my fervor, our conversations, fluctuating in an orbit which is neuter to a degree, equally alien to the atmosphere of the small German city where Anneliese Roos is born and that part of Brazil's Northeast which

Already have an account? Login

Join KR for even more to read.

Register for a free account to read five free pieces a month from our current issue and digital archive.
Register for Free and Read This Piece



Or become a subscriber today and get complete, immediate access to our digital archives at every subscription level.

Read More

The Shallowest Man

By Woody Allen

Translated from the Portuguese.   The rhythm of the life and the bells of Eltville (there Anneliese Roos is born and there her people live) reverberates in everything she does: […]

Subscribe

Your free registration with Kenyon review incudes access to exclusive content, early access to program registration, and more.

Donate

With your support, we’ll continue 
to cultivate talent and publish extraordinary literature from diverse voices around the world.