Fall 1969 • Vol. XXXI No. 5 Book ReviewsJanuary 1, 1969 |

Shorter Reviews: The New Yorkers

The New Yorkers by Hortense Calisher. Little, Brown and Company, $7.95. So many echoes reverberate throughout The New Yorkers that the reader has the choice of being tantalized or infuriated. The symbols pile up and collide; the urge to pin down the name of the game distracts. What does it all mean? Is Hortense Calisher, whose style has grown increasingly more convoluted, simply (read complicated) telling a story that makes a number of general human points, or do all those allusions to trinities, to circles, to stigmata, to rites of passage constitute a religious argument? Does she have in mind some archetype or myth? some political or economic allegory? The book is awash in mysteries. Orchestrated as to incident as well as to phrase—balances are calculated and recur rhythmically—it is, in fact, choreographed, and part of the vocabulary is literally borrowed from the ballet. Further, Miss Calisher in the Texas Quarterly has recently described the act of writing as "a dancing

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Plot Luck

By Kenneth John Atchity

The New Yorkers by Hortense Calisher. Little, Brown and Company, $7.95. So many echoes reverberate throughout The New Yorkers that the reader has the choice of being tantalized or infuriated. […]

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