Spring 1969 • Vol. XXXI No. 2 Nonfiction |

Philip Marlowe Speaking

"You know something, Marlowe? I could get to like you. You're a bit of a bastard—like me." —The Long Goodbye Raymond Chandler wrote about Los Angeles during its period of kooky architecture. Chateaus and villas and castles, all redolent of other lands, dominated the lush hillsides of Beverly Hills and Bel Air. Down below, in Hollywood, could be found the gingerbread counterpart to this not quite real world of the very rich and the very exclusive—restaurants, drive-ins, commercial buildings, even conservative establishments like banks which took on the shapes of stuffed animals and items of headdress, or of recognizable physical objects, or bore broad resemblance to sugar-frosted palaces of desert sheiks. The casual observer of this sun-drenched land, faced with the imagination gone rampant, might wonder if perhaps it would all suddenly disappear in a cataclysm, or somehow turn back into a pumpkin; but Raymond Chandler was an intimate of the scene, and he mapped its contou

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Tietjens in Disguise

By R. W. Lid

"You know something, Marlowe? I could get to like you. You're a bit of a bastard—like me." —The Long Goodbye Raymond Chandler wrote about Los Angeles during its period of […]

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