Fall 1969 • Vol. XXXI No. 4 The International Symposium on the Short Story, Part Three |

Norway

I have always seen the short story as an oval in form-the form of a drop. Perhaps because, like a drop, it can absorb and in an instant return a ray of light, the spectrum; or perhaps because it conveys both the transparent and the secretive. In any event, it is a vulgarization to claim that it really is a novel in mini-format. Neither can I see what often passes for a story today-the "prose text"-as anything but another kind of vulgarization-and dry as a punch card. In my view, these prose texts have no other similarity with the short story than that they may remind one of the first notes one uses as a point of departure. This may seem polemical, but that is not my intention. My acquaintance with recent literature's prose texts is so superficial that I am really not entitled to an inflexible opinion. All in all, I am glad that the short story has such liberal conditions in intellectual Norway that we can afford experimentation—and a quarrel. Concretely, the short story may be

Already have an account? Login

Join KR for even more to read.

Register for a free account to read five free pieces a month from our current issue and digital archive.
Register for Free and Read This Piece



Or become a subscriber today and get complete, immediate access to our digital archives at every subscription level.

Read More

England

By Elizabeth Taylor

I have always seen the short story as an oval in form-the form of a drop. Perhaps because, like a drop, it can absorb and in an instant return a […]

Subscribe

Your free registration with Kenyon review incudes access to exclusive content, early access to program registration, and more.

Donate

With your support, we’ll continue 
to cultivate talent and publish extraordinary literature from diverse voices around the world.