Winter 1969 • Vol. XXXI No. 1 The International Symposium on the Short Story, Part TwoJanuary 1, 1969 |

New Zealand

A symposium always tempts foolish generalizations into the light; but at least the fool who generalizes has the consolation that he will not be alone. I should like to be able to discuss the economic and literary health of the short story at length. But upon its economic health I am no authority. All I can say for myself is that I've always found it an economically unhealthy form; and I've never expected it to be other. Of the twenty-five odd stories and novellas I have published in three separate volumes over the past eight years, perhaps no more than two or three have found prior publication in magazines. It is years now since I tried a short story upon a magazine, in my own country or outside. Length may be part of the problem: most editors appear to like short stories short, and it is ten years since I wrote a story much under 10,000 words; some have been two or three times that length. So I write with book publication, and book publication only, in mind. And publishing stor

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United States

By William Saroyan

A symposium always tempts foolish generalizations into the light; but at least the fool who generalizes has the consolation that he will not be alone. I should like to be […]

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