Fall 1969 • Vol. XXXI No. 5 Poetry |

Leopardi

    The palace at Recanati, crowned with merlons       and adorned with a bronze clock     boasts the remains of a Palladian fountain.       The piano nobile     houses a library of twelve thousand volumes.       One room is dedicated     to the poet (manuscripts, souvenirs, a marble       bust) who was born and lived here. i   The locusts (we call them cavallette,   little mares) that persist in singing   after sunset are the ones will die   next day. It is dark already. Who   would believe how loud! I am trying   to leam, from their voices, the dying fall. ii  I was in the garden, near the caretaker's house,   sitting on a bench where the tired fountain drips;   no one could see me there, for I had thrown a cloak   over my shirt, and my face is not a pale one.   Two young men lay on the steps, joking together   under the colored lantern, drinking

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Occupations

By Richard Howard

    The palace at Recanati, crowned with merlons       and adorned with a bronze clock     boasts the remains of a Palladian fountain.       The piano nobile     houses a library of twelve thousand volumes. […]

For Matthew Ward, 1951-1990

By Richard Howard

    The palace at Recanati, crowned with merlons       and adorned with a bronze clock     boasts the remains of a Palladian fountain.       The piano nobile     houses a library of twelve thousand volumes. […]

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