Winter 1969 • Vol. XXXI No. 1 The International Symposium on the Short Story, Part TwoJanuary 1, 1969 |

Japan

Recently, a leading literary magazine, Gunzo, sent an inquiry to five active writers, asking them whether they preferred a novel or a short story to deal effectively with contemporary problems, both literary and social. Their responses, published in the April issue, seem to indicate general attitudes on the part of present-day Japanese writers toward the two forms of fiction, the novel and the short story. It may be worth-while to note what they had to say. Two writers out of five, namely Hiroshi Noma and Kazumi Takahashi, strongly assert their positions as novel-writers (or, rather, as writers of the roman total, according to Noma); while two others, Kazuo Ozaki and Mrs. Fumiko Enchi, both belong- ing to what we call the prewar generation, express their personal attachment to the short story. The last one of them, Shotaro Yasuoka, himself a charming short-story writer, reveals a somewhat skeptical opinion as to the future of his once-favorite form. But this may in part be due t

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United States

By William Saroyan

Recently, a leading literary magazine, Gunzo, sent an inquiry to five active writers, asking them whether they preferred a novel or a short story to deal effectively with contemporary problems, […]

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