Winter 1969 • Vol. XXXI No. 1 Department KR: A Section of Briefer Comment |

Camus at His Sources

Albert Camus has always had a special appeal for American readers. The Stranger, The Plague, The Fall, The Myth of Sisyphus, The Rebel have been sowing moral and intellectual provocation on this side of the Atlantic for more than twenty years. No American writer of our time, in fact, has had so profound an effect on the last several generations of American students as this French Algerian. His political and philosophical essays are prized for their illumination of man's struggle for a viable ethic on the level of the human condition alone. His novels are savored as allegories embodying contemporary moral and philosophical dilemmas. Such was their author's ambition. Camus was not a subscriber to realism in art, nor was he primarily interested in exploring individual psyches, least of all his own. If this has led some readers to mistake his novels for riddles compounded by means of cold philosophical formulas divorced from real life, many of these essays will come as a happy surprise.

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United States

By William Saroyan

Albert Camus has always had a special appeal for American readers. The Stranger, The Plague, The Fall, The Myth of Sisyphus, The Rebel have been sowing moral and intellectual provocation […]

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