Fall 1968 • Vol. XXX No. 4 The International Symposium on the Short Story, Part OneJanuary 1, 1968 |

United States

United States: Herbert Gold All public mourning about the plight of fiction circa 1968 is irrelevant, tendentious, and boring, and, in fact, is hereby pro- hibited, on pain of condemnation to solitary confinement in the groupy, gathered small print of symposia. This is not to say that it's easy to get stories written, published, or read. Dicta: Those who love the art of storytelling cannot help dreaming out and trying to control their fantasies. Some of them are readers and some of them become writers. The im- pulse to make stories is an essential part of all the dreaming about altematives which makes men human. Below the reverie line we are constantly formulating decisions, and when we drag them up and give them shape we are on the way to enforcing these formulations. One more step to making a life. A few notes on the moral connections of the storyteller with his story: STYLE. The storyteller's story must first of all carry the accidents and inevitabilities of his tale, not simply

Already have an account? Login

Join KR for even more to read.

Register for a free account to read five free pieces a month from our current issue and digital archive.
Register for Free and Read This Piece



Or become a subscriber today and get complete, immediate access to our digital archives at every subscription level.

Read More

Australia

By Henrietta Drake-Brockman

United States: Herbert Gold All public mourning about the plight of fiction circa 1968 is irrelevant, tendentious, and boring, and, in fact, is hereby pro- hibited, on pain of condemnation […]

South Africa

By Nadine Gordimer

United States: Herbert Gold All public mourning about the plight of fiction circa 1968 is irrelevant, tendentious, and boring, and, in fact, is hereby pro- hibited, on pain of condemnation […]

Subscribe

Your free registration with Kenyon review incudes access to exclusive content, early access to program registration, and more.

Donate

With your support, we’ll continue 
to cultivate talent and publish extraordinary literature from diverse voices around the world.