Winter 1968 • Vol. XXX No. 1 Nonfiction |

Proust Recaptured

The Paris publication of a new three-volume edition of the French text of A la recherche du temps perdu, by Editions Gallimard in its "Bibliothèque de la Pléiade" series of classics, constitutes a challenge to publishers of all existing translations of this major masterpiece of twentieth-century literature. But it also suggests new questions to the minds of the host of scholars and commentators who, for close on 50 years, have zealously contributed to a corpus of Proustian literature which has already achieved almost Talmudic proportions. Much of this literature has long been obsolete. In his masterful two-volume biography of Proust, George D. Painter resolved most of the contradictions that might still puzzle one in the mass of available testimony on Proust's life, on his intentions as a writer, and on the real-life sources of his fiction. But now we also have access, in the footnotes and the annexes to the new edition, to the secret laboratory in which Proust composed and co

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Excursion

By William Fifield

The Paris publication of a new three-volume edition of the French text of A la recherche du temps perdu, by Editions Gallimard in its "Bibliothèque de la Pléiade" series of […]

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