Fall 1968 • Vol. XXX No. 5 Department KR: A Section of Briefer Comment |

Conversion and After

Nancy Huddleston Packer / Conversion and After MY FATHER'S FAVORITE JOKF SYMBOLIZED OUR FAMILY' S attitude toward religion. A little boy told his Sunday School teacher that another little boy had said there wasn't a God. When the teacher said, "And what did you say?" the little boy replied, "I said I don't care." My mother always claimed she believed the usual, but she never did a thing to prove that she did. Neither of my parents ever went to church except on out-and-out political occasions. My father was an avowed disbeliever, but in the interests of a stable society he kept his scoffing within the family. His only indulgence was to tell his joke to his God-fearing country cous- ins and to devout preachers. Yet every Sunday morning between September and June, which was the nine months we lived in Washington, D. C., our father sent all five of us children off to Sunday Sclhool. When we said he didn't set much of an example, he had a dozen replies. He said he had served his time. He

Already have an account? Log in

Join KR for even more to read.

Register for a free account to read five free pieces a month from our current issue and digital archive.
Register for Free and Read This Piece



Or become a subscriber today and get complete, immediate access to our digital archives at every subscription level.

Read More

Night Guard

By Nancy Huddleston Packer

Nancy Huddleston Packer / Conversion and After MY FATHER'S FAVORITE JOKF SYMBOLIZED OUR FAMILY' S attitude toward religion. A little boy told his Sunday School teacher that another little boy […]

Subscribe

Your free registration with Kenyon review incudes access to exclusive content, early access to program registration, and more.

Donate

With your support, we’ll continue 
to cultivate talent and publish extraordinary literature from diverse voices around the world.