Spring 1968 • Vol. XXX No. 2 NonfictionJanuary 1, 1968 |

Adaptations and Adaptors

Mary Otis Hivnor ADAPTATIONS AND ADAPTORS This discussion continued for qulite some time, and periodically returned during the rest of the night. It wvas clear that the audience -which included many of America's leading professionals-was unable to formulate or articulate what it wanted from the theatre. . . . It was distressingly clear that, anmong this audience at least, there was no strong feeling about whluat the thleatre should be, what its purposes were. . . .-Excerpts from a "Marat/Sade Forum" (an evening debate transcribed in the Tulanie Drama Review; the participants were Peter Brook, Leslie Ficedler, Geraldine Lust, Nor- man Podhoretz, Ian Richardson, and Gordon Rogoff). NOVELISTS SINCE HENRY JAMES HAVE VIEWED THE THEATER AS an alien institution, unfavorably influenced by money, and re- quiring from them unseemly vulgarity and sentiment. Most theatergoers accept the status quo. Once they have arrived at an idea of what a play ought to be, they are impossible to budge. This

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Mary Otis Hivnor ADAPTATIONS AND ADAPTORS This discussion continued for qulite some time, and periodically returned during the rest of the night. It wvas clear that the audience -which included […]

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