Winter 1967 • Vol. XXIX No. 1 Book ReviewsJanuary 1, 1967 |

Thomas Carlyle, Novelist

Sartor Called Resartus: The Genesis, Structure, and Style of Thomas Carlyle's First Major Work by G. B. Tennyson. Princeton University Press, $8.50.   The great Victorian moralist and historian also was the most ingenious experimental novelist of his time. Mr. Tennyson reminds us that—even though cataloguers sometimes list Sartor Resartus under "essays and belles-lettres"—Carlyle's first important book was an intricate piece of fiction, as curiously devised as the avant-garde novels of our age. Though Sartor has but two characters of any importance, it is not a philosopher's tract, for neither The Editor nor Herr D. Teufelsdröckh is a mere mask for Carlyle. "Love is not Pleasure; love God. This is the Everlasting Yea, wherein all contradiction is solved; wherein whoso walks and works, it is well with him." That is the essence of Sartor Resartus, and this burning belief made Carlyle a power in the world from that time forward. Fiercely contemptuous though he was of t

Already have an account? Login

Join KR for even more to read.

Register for a free account to read five free pieces a month from our current issue and digital archive.
Register for Free and Read This Piece



Or become a subscriber today and get complete, immediate access to our digital archives at every subscription level.

Read More

Quixotism Vindicated

By Russell Kirk

Sartor Called Resartus: The Genesis, Structure, and Style of Thomas Carlyle's First Major Work by G. B. Tennyson. Princeton University Press, $8.50.   The great Victorian moralist and historian also […]

Subscribe

Your free registration with Kenyon review incudes access to exclusive content, early access to program registration, and more.

Donate

With your support, we’ll continue 
to cultivate talent and publish extraordinary literature from diverse voices around the world.