Winter 1967 • Vol. XXIX No. 1 Book Reviews |

Lovely Shapes of Anguish

Four Novels by Marguerite Duras (The Square, translated by Sonia Pitt-Rivers and Irina Morduch; Moderato Cantabile, translated by Richard Seaver; Ten-Thirty on a Summer Night, translated by Anne Borchardt; The Afternoon of Mr. Andesmas, translated by Anne Borchardt). Grove Press, $3.95.   At our oceanic distance, it is easy to pretend that no distinctions exist among French writers except age, sex, and degree of opposition to De Gaulle. Camus protested futilely against being lumped among the Existentialists, and Genet is still usually deposited (at arm's length and with a sigh of relief) in the squirming pile known as Dramatists of the Absurd. Similarly, it has become the custom to group Marguerite Duras with Robbe-Grillet, Nathalie Sarraute, Michel Butor, Robert Pinget, and other violators of convention, calling all of them scribblers of the "anti-novel," authors of "thingism" or "aliterature"-as if to do so were safely to remove all individual characteristics and to reduce

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Thomas Carlyle, Novelist

By Russell Kirk

Four Novels by Marguerite Duras (The Square, translated by Sonia Pitt-Rivers and Irina Morduch; Moderato Cantabile, translated by Richard Seaver; Ten-Thirty on a Summer Night, translated by Anne Borchardt; The […]

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