Winter 1966 • Vol. XXVIII No. 1 Book Reviews |

Sexus

Sexus by Henry Miller. Grove Press, $1.25.   Grove Press has published an imitation of Henry Miller by Henry Miller. It should make the stockholders very happy. And the reviewers. And all those weeklies and monthlies and quarterlies on the Coast that really hate literature. The stockholders will make money; the reviewers can go on for another week; the literary lumpenproletariat will have another proof that they are the salt of the earth. What is Sexus? A solipsism 634 pages long. Forget the sex, which is by Evergreen out of Playboy anyhow. Here Miller describes himself: "a broad grin came over my face, then softened to an amiable smile." No consciousness of the logical impropriety committed. The reason that this is a bad book is not that it is the literary equivalent of a Neapolitan exhibition. What is wrong is characteristic of all cult writers: the self substitutes for the world. When Miller talks about the smile on his face or the city he exists in or the woman of the mi

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Myth or Criticism

By Ronald Berman

Sexus by Henry Miller. Grove Press, $1.25.   Grove Press has published an imitation of Henry Miller by Henry Miller. It should make the stockholders very happy. And the reviewers. […]

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