Winter 1965 • Vol. XXVII No. 1 Poetry |

The Marriage Wig

If you're going to marry, make sure you first know whom you're going to divorce. —Yiddish Proverb 1. The Mishnah says I blind you with my hair, that when I bind it in a net my fingers waylay my friends; that in a close house I shake loose the Pleiades into your kitchen…. How can I let you see me, past and future, blemishes and dust? Must I shear away my hair and wear the wig the sages say? Will you receive me, rejoice me, take me for your wall? To any man not blind, a wig is false. 2. Once upon a time I wrote a boy into my calendar of weddings. We lived in a gargoyle house with many eyes, in one room. Arctic snow furred the streetlamps. Insidewe had our wine, one pot, an innocent fire. Now the gargoyle house is gone. On a tree is the orphan number, forty-nine, meaning 49, a house, a marriage, a time scythed clean, crunched to powder, flat as a grave, as though we'd never been. Let me apologize for that lost number. 3. Let me apologize for al

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Her Delirium

By Ruth Whitman

If you're going to marry, make sure you first know whom you're going to divorce. —Yiddish Proverb 1. The Mishnah says I blind you with my hair, that when I […]

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