Winter 1963 • Vol. XXV No. 1 Book ReviewsJanuary 1, 1963 |

Comedy and Darkness

Morte D'Urban by J. F. Powers. Doubleday and Company, $4.50. Toward the end of "The Prince of Darkness," the Archbishop tells Father Burner: "Today there are few saints, fewer sinners, and everybody is already saved. We are all heroes in search of an underdog. As for villains, the classic kind with no illusions about themselves, they are . . . extinct. The very devil, for instance, where the devil is the devil, Father?" A little later the Archbishop tells how, after his infrequent banquet speeches, he's told "unfailingly" by "the exceedingly well-off" that "religion is a great consolation," a dim compliment that makes him feel, "perhaps wrongfully and borrowing a word from one of our late competitors"—"Opium, rather." The real devil, now and always, the Archbishop thinks, is neither "hard to the right" nor left. "It is rather to the center . . . the devil in us." The Archbishop's analysis of "today," the rich, the right and the left, our inner center, is close to

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Without a Peer

By Harvey Curtis Webster

Morte D'Urban by J. F. Powers. Doubleday and Company, $4.50. Toward the end of "The Prince of Darkness," the Archbishop tells Father Burner: "Today there are few saints, fewer sinners, […]

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