Winter 1960 • Vol. XXII No. 1 Book ReviewsJanuary 1, 1960 |

Antilles Men

The Ripening by Edouard Glissant. Translated by Frances Frenaye. George Braziller, Inc. $3.75 This first novel by a Martinique poet was awarded the prix Renaudot in1958. Edouard Glissant, born on September 28, 1928—thirty years to the day before Martinique voted "oui" in de Gaulle's referendum—has studied at the Lycée Schoelcher in Fort-de-France, the University of Paris, and the Musée de l'Homme. One of his three volumes of verse, Les Indes, previously won considerable critical acclaim. In some respects he is merely following a tradition that had kept Martinique in the vanguard of French Negro letters. René Maran had pioneered in 1921 with Batouala (Prix Goncourt). Poets Etienne Léro, Gilbert Gratiant, and especially Aimé Césaire had followed, along with essayist Jules Monnerot. In 1950 Joseph Zobel had won the Prix des Lecteurs for his novel La Rue Cases-Nègres. All these writers had lived or studied in metropolitan France. This flowering of Martinican writin

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Once over Lightly: The Cave

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The Ripening by Edouard Glissant. Translated by Frances Frenaye. George Braziller, Inc. $3.75 This first novel by a Martinique poet was awarded the prix Renaudot in1958. Edouard Glissant, born on […]

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