Winter 1957 • Vol. XIX No. 1 NonfictionJanuary 1, 1957 |

The Meters of the Intermediate Poets

The Liveliness of a group of papers recently brought together in this Review ("English Verse and What it Sounds Like," Summer I956) seems to me a good omen for poetry. The four critics represented all want to bring the poem to life in the reader's auditory imagination; poets never could have desired less. But the only 20th Century poem discussed there was Robert Frost's sonnet "Mowing," whereas I think that more recent poems deserve metrical analysis too, even if the going is sometimes harder. Or is the feeling widespread that the prosodist nowadays should cheerfully allow himself to become technologically unemployed? Anyone so minded should look back at the exchange that took place between Mr. Ransom and Mr. Chatman. The latter transcribed, faithfully I should think, the recorded voice of Robert Frost reading And that was my long scythe whispering to the ground, while Mr. Ransom proposed another reading, and drew the conclusion that there "cannot be another art whose

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A Taste of Ashes

By George Hemphill

The Liveliness of a group of papers recently brought together in this Review ("English Verse and What it Sounds Like," Summer I956) seems to me a good omen for poetry. […]

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