Winter 1956 • Vol. XVIII No. 1 Poetry |

Ontology for Beginners

Bright striped urchins flay each other with sand. They have contrived a conquest for shell shucks . . . . .               —Hart Crane The daughter is wed to the delighted father In a mystic sacrament with paper rings. "Daddy, does everybody have to die?" "Like Icarus, we all must fly." The icons of the winter are broken, And rain regenerates the land In newly turned sand boxes. "Does everybody have to be buried?" "We all are ferried, ferried, ferried." Confession, purgation, absolution are Received in whispers at a seaside More gentle to the child than at The ocean birth of the goddess. "How do buried people talk?" "Their words are told in the dust of chalk." The metaphysics of the child: Death, rebirth; death, rebirth With each cap pistol shot. "I don't want the dirt in my teeth; I don't want to play in the earth."

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Pygmalion

By Harry C. Morris

Bright striped urchins flay each other with sand. They have contrived a conquest for shell shucks . . . . .               —Hart Crane The daughter is wed to the delighted […]

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