Winter 1949 • Vol. XI No. 1 NonfictionJanuary 1, 1949 |

The Places and the Figures

With a tradition we incur its wars along with the rest and one measure of our participation may be our readiness to suspect. Even a harmless looking academic sentence may not be exempt: "In the renaissance, as in earlier times, educated men amplified a subject by drawing it as a matter of course through the topics of invention." Of these sixteen are intrinsic: definition, division, genus, species, contraries, contradictories, comparison, similarity, dissimilarity, adjuncts, cause, effect, antecedent, consequent, notation and conjugates. These supply the artificial arguments, "so called because they are discoverable through the art of topical investigation." In addition there are the extrinsic, inartificial arguments, whose source is testimony. The Lucifer-like fall of this word artificial (along with trivial) is an indication of a shift in the intent of education since then. We are not so sure, now, that we should amplify subjects rather than contract them, and this not merely becau

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The Screens

By I. A. Richards

With a tradition we incur its wars along with the rest and one measure of our participation may be our readiness to suspect. Even a harmless looking academic sentence may […]

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