Winter 1947 • Vol. IX No. 1 Book ReviewsJanuary 1, 1947 |

Theatre and Poetry Too

The Frontiers Of Drama by Una Ellis-Fermor. London: Methuen. The drama has been the victim of more irresponsible criticism and irrelevant scholarship than any other of the literary arts. Perhaps this is because it is only partly literary, and many of its unique conventions are non-verbal. Like the poet the dramatist uses words, their meanings, patterns, and sounds, but he uses other tools also which we are less well-equipped to analyze: physical space, patterns of physical action, contrasts and relationships which are apparent only to the theatre-trained eye. On the other hand, almost any Shakespearian revival will demonstrate how blind the theatre-trained eye can be to the literary values of a play, to its implications and inner complexities. The sound drama critic and scholar must somehow strike a balance between theatre-wisdom and poetic-wisdom, must know where the search for inner meaning must begin and—perhaps more important—where it must stop. The ideal is an experienc

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Man Facing His Evil

By Robert Redfield

The Frontiers Of Drama by Una Ellis-Fermor. London: Methuen. The drama has been the victim of more irresponsible criticism and irrelevant scholarship than any other of the literary arts. Perhaps […]

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