Winter 1946 • Vol. VIII No. 1 Communication |

The Brushing-off of Miller

Sirs: Mr. Bentley's casual imputation of insincerity to Henry Miller, while reviewing Miller's Sunday After the War in the Summer issue, provokes a protest. I say "casual" because the statement that Miller merely acts the man of feeling follows the bland admission that the reviewer has read only two of Miller's books. I do not believe that at this late date there is much excuse for assigning Miller's books to a reviewer who is ignorant of the larger body of his work. Excepting the novels, Miller's books are quite easily obtainable in this country and fill a shelf of respectable size. I refer Mr. Bentley to Bern Porter Books, 2303 Durant, Berkeley, California, for a bibliography. Too many critics in the past have devoted themselves seriously to Miller's books to make it permissible now for a journal of the stature of the Kenyon Review to dismiss him in a few negligible paragraphs. But granted that Mr. Bentley was allotted little space in which to work, there is still not much excu

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Escape to Reality

By W. P. Southard

Sirs: Mr. Bentley's casual imputation of insincerity to Henry Miller, while reviewing Miller's Sunday After the War in the Summer issue, provokes a protest. I say "casual" because the statement […]

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