Winter 1946 • Vol. VIII No. 1 PoetryJanuary 1, 1946 |

A Place (Any Place) to Transcend All Places

In New York, it is said, they do meet (if that is what is wanted, talk) but nothing is exchanged unless that guff can be retranslated: as to say, that is not the end, there are channels above that, draining places from which New York is dignified, created (the deaf are not tuned in). A church in New Hampshire built by its pastor from his own wood-lot. One black (of course, red) rose; a fat old woman backing through a screen door. Two, from the armpits down, contrasting in bed, breathless; a letter from a ship; leaves filling, making, a tree (but wait) not just leaves,leaves of one design that make a certain design, no two alike, not like the locust either, next in line, nor the rose of Sharon, in the pod stage, near it—a tree! Imagine it! Pears philosophically hard. Nor thought that is from branches on a root, from an acid soil, with scant grass about the bole where it breaks through. New York is built of such grass and weeds; a modern tuberculous-tested herd white-faced beh

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William Carlos Williams (1883-1963) was a major writer in the modernist movement. His works include Kora in Hell (1920), Spring and All (1923), and Pictures from Brueghel and Other Poems (1962). Williams was a highly acclaimed writer, winning the National Book Award in 1950 and the Pulitzer Prize in 1963.

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Madrigal

By John Edward Hardy

In New York, it is said, they do meet (if that is what is wanted, talk) but nothing is exchanged unless that guff can be retranslated: as to say, that […]

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