weekend-readsFast-Food America

When writers claim to avoid interstates and fast-food restaurants in order to find the real America, get set for foolishness about old-time dialects, country crafts, and characters of the sort they don't make anymore. Or so the writer will assure you, and praise himself (almost always it is a man) for being ballsy enough to turn off the four-lane and find real folks rooted in their region who can't be confused with people three states away or even on the other side of the mountain. These are people, he'll promise you, that it's worth traveling to see because their identities remain rooted in the place and its past. Most of these books are unbearably certain that you must follow the backroads or else be damned to live in a postmodern hell where everything looks the same and nothing has the savor of its place. And where, of course, there are no stories. It's not that these travel writers take backroads to find the vivid, the salty, the forgotten that annoys me; it's that they deny ot

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Longitudinal Study

By JP Grasser

When writers claim to avoid interstates and fast-food restaurants in order to find the real America, get set for foolishness about old-time dialects, country crafts, and characters of the sort […]

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