Spring 2023 • Vol. XLV No. 2 Translation Folio |

Don’t Hide the Madness

betcha it’s closed up already, can tell from way over here, no, keep moving in to see, still a chance it’s open, no, already said, been closed for a while now, house number’s faded away, no, look, exert the eyes, there’s some message in chalk, just the scribbling of those kids, no, still a chance someone’s there, go ahead and knock then, hear the echo, that’s it, not so, the echo of a knock is just the knock itself, already said, no one at all’s there, no, listen, open the ears, there’s some response from within, just the stray whistling of a wild wind, no, still a chance there’s, hey, watch through the crack, the curtains are fluttering, there’s got to be something inside, of course there’s something inside, is there anything that hasn’t got something inside, no, don’t play like that, perhaps it’s a cat, not at all, just the wind pounding, no sense in wind pounding some place where no one is, oh hell, when isn’t wind senselessly pounding some place whe

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Nhã Thuyên was born in 1986, in Vit Nam and works as a writer and editor in Hà Ni. Her most recent books are bất\ \tuẫn: những hiện diện [tự-] vắng trong thơ Việt and its English edition: un\ \martyred: [self-]vanishing presences in Vietnamese poetry (Roofbook, 2019) and Moon Fevers (Tilted Axis Press, 2019). Her main practices are writing between languages, experimenting with translations, and poetic exchanges. With Kaitlin Rees, she founded AJAR in 2014, a micro bilingual literary journal-press, a precariously online, printed space for poetic exchange. She otherwise talks to walls and soliloquies nonsense when having no other emergencies of life to deal with. Her next book of poetry vị nước (taste of waters) is waiting to see the moon.

Photo of Kaitlin Rees

Kaitlin Rees is a translator, editor, and teacher based in New York City, with reachings toward Hanoi. She translates from the Vietnamese of Nhã Thuyên, with whom she cofounded AJAR, a small bilingual journal-presse that organizes an occasional poetry festival. Her full-length translations include Moon Fevers (Tilted Axis, 2019), words breathe, creatures of elsewhere (Vagabond Press, 2016), and the forthcoming book of poetry taste of water.

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Pareidolia

By Kira Homsher

betcha it’s closed up already, can tell from way over here, no, keep moving in to see, still a chance it’s open, no, already said, been closed for a while […]

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