Summer 2023 • Vol. XLV No. 1 Introduction |

Brian Teare Introduces fahima ife

I first read fahima ife’s brilliant debut, Maroon Choreography, shortly after reading visual artist Torkwase Dyson’s essay “Black Interiority: Notes on Architecture, Infrastructure, Environmental Justice, and Abstract Drawing.” Maroon Choreographyimmediately constellated itself with Dyson and others whose work theorizes the Black Anthropocene / the Plantationocene — Christina Sharpe, Kathryn Yusoff, and Dionne Brand primary among them. But I could not not read ife’s choreography of black study through Dyson’s practice of “black compositional thought,” which Dyson describes as making work from “the black-inside-black position.” Visual artists and poets are both makers, and Dyson’s writing about her own poetics still seems to me consonant with my experience of ife’s. “In the act of making I understand that it is the integrations of forms folded into the conditions of black spatial justice,” Dyson writes. And, “Here I open up the power of abstrac

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A 2020 Guggenheim Fellow, Brian Teare is the author of eight chapbooks and six critically acclaimed books, including Doomstead Days, winner of the Four Quartets Prize and a finalist for the National Book Critics Circle, Kingsley Tufts, and Lambda Literary awards. His seventh book, Poem Bitten by a Man, is forthcoming from Nightboat Books in fall 2023. After more than a decade of teaching and writing in the San Francisco Bay Area, and eight years in Philadelphia, Teare is now an associate professor of poetry at the University of Virginia. He lives in Charlottesville, where he makes books by hand for his micropress, Albion Books.

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Excerpts from Poem Bitten by a Man

By Brian Teare

I first read fahima ife’s brilliant debut, Maroon Choreography, shortly after reading visual artist Torkwase Dyson’s essay “Black Interiority: Notes on Architecture, Infrastructure, Environmental Justice, and Abstract Drawing.” Maroon Choreographyimmediately […]

Convince me you have a seed there

By Brian Teare

I first read fahima ife’s brilliant debut, Maroon Choreography, shortly after reading visual artist Torkwase Dyson’s essay “Black Interiority: Notes on Architecture, Infrastructure, Environmental Justice, and Abstract Drawing.” Maroon Choreographyimmediately […]

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