Spring 2013 • Vol. XXXV No. 2 FictionApril 1, 2013 |

On Ohaeto Street

At the time of the robbery, Eze and Chinwe were living in the town of Elelenwo in Port Harcourt. They lived in Maewood Estates, which many people called Ehoro's Estate, because Ehoro was the surname of the estate's owner. Theirs was a two-bedroom bungalow, though there were also three-bedroom and four-bedroom bungalows in the estate because there were families with children living there. They themselves did not have any children, though having children was something that they had intended they would one day do. In any case, Ehoro's was a fairly large estate—about a dozen bungalows total in it. The bungalows stood in clusters, separated only by gravel and grass, by the road connecting them, and by trees: orange trees, guava trees, plantain trees. There was a driveway in front of each bungalow, and each bungalow had a garage. A cement wall rose high along the perimeter of the estate, and with it, two oversized metal gates, one at the entrance, the other at the exit. The top

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Illegitimate

By Mia McKenzie

At the time of the robbery, Eze and Chinwe were living in the town of Elelenwo in Port Harcourt. They lived in Maewood Estates, which many people called Ehoro's Estate, […]

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