Spring 2011 • Vol. XXXIII No. 2 PoetryApril 1, 2011 |

a better apple

—unlike varieties of hybrids requiring new genetics—   the native fruit stock at the edge of fields—the basic apple with its wild sweetness and its bitter seeds resists the inventories of scabs—galls—rusts—blight—insects and the chemistries that resist them—drought—storm—bitten by temperatures   —temperate—birds—ruin an apple—with a single peck     —the residents as well in their innocence of stealth threading at night shadows of paths trespassing orchards assume the right to sample whatever ripening crop dangles survival—erect   craning their necks to supple twigs and nuzzling all that falls   —the uncontrollable restraints of nature itself for that matter seduce the eye—the ruddiness bulging plump and dimpled —that state of ripeness tempting with what press and ooze of scent suggest the appearance of a taste—to process marketing   from lab to farm—display to table—from the hand to mouth

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Roger Desy works a small body of poems until they work themselves. While we’re born and will die on this planet, our relation to it is intimate. He taught literature and creative writing, edited technical manuals, helped set up a neglected one-room schoolhouse as a venue for readings/music/community programs, raised a family that now raises itself, and “learned cat” from the sweetest tabby that ever adopted one of our kind. A few poems are in Cider Press Review, Kenyon Review, Mid-American Review, Midwest Quarterly, Poet Lore, and South Carolina Review.

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—unlike varieties of hybrids requiring new genetics—   the native fruit stock at the edge of fields—the basic apple with its wild sweetness and its bitter seeds resists the inventories […]

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—unlike varieties of hybrids requiring new genetics—   the native fruit stock at the edge of fields—the basic apple with its wild sweetness and its bitter seeds resists the inventories […]

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