Spring 2010 • Vol. XXXII No. 2 Editor's Notes |

Editor’s Notes

Over the past few years I've spent a fair bit of time in these notes and elsewhere musing about the direction and future of literary printing. Even the word itself as a verb suggests the quandary. To print, to stamp, to transfer ink, to leave an impression. What kind of trace remains when the printing is virtual (another word, a notion, that leaves me queasy), a matter of 1's and 0's and pixels on a screen, electronic pulses that may come to be stored in, well, a cloud. But of course, queasy or not, this is exactly the trajectory we are riding. And, as I've argued, there's very much good to come from electronic dissemination. Instant and international reach. Lower costs. All but infinite capacity. And so on. As part of a significant internal review led by our trustees some years ago, The Kenyon Review chose to recast its mission and, among other challenges, stake a place at the forefront of electronic innovation---asking tough questions, suggesting some possible answers. KRO

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Photo of David Lynn
David H. Lynn is the editor emeritus of The Kenyon Review, a professor of English, and special assistant to the president of the college. He was the editor of the Review from 1994 to 2020. As an author, he received a 2016 O. Henry Award for "Divergence." His latest collection, Children of God: New & Selected Stories, was published in 2019 by Braddock Avenue Books.

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Editor’s Notes

By David H. Lynn

Over the past few years I've spent a fair bit of time in these notes and elsewhere musing about the direction and future of literary printing. Even the word itself […]

Editor’s Notes

By David H. Lynn

Over the past few years I've spent a fair bit of time in these notes and elsewhere musing about the direction and future of literary printing. Even the word itself […]

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