Spring 2010 • Vol. XXXII No. 2 PoetryApril 1, 2010 |

A Childhood Memory of Wordsworth’s

Translated from French by Hoyt Rogers   As in the Prelude, when the child sets forth, Unconscious as the light, and spots a boat; And pushes off, between the earth and sky, To row toward another shore . . . But then He sees a huge black crag, looming Taller and taller behind the rest; And in his dread, returns to the reeds, Where the tiniest lives eternally hum . . . So this great poet must have launched His thought on a calm hour of language, And believed himself redeemed by speech. But silently, other currents drove his words Ahead of what his mind could apprehend, Till he feared he'd overtopped his desire.

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Poetry

By Cynthia Cruz

Translated from French by Hoyt Rogers   As in the Prelude, when the child sets forth, Unconscious as the light, and spots a boat; And pushes off, between the earth […]

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