Spring 2006 • Vol. XXVIII No. 2 Poetry |

Husbands and Wives

(From The Decalogue, IX) Because Kieslowski's subject is the enduring power of love,of course when Roman discovers his impotency is permanent and suggeststo Hanka that she divorce him, she says no, insists loveis in the heart, not between the legs. She does, in fact, take a lover,a young man with hair the color of the pale Polish sun, but of courseit doesn't fulfill her. She feels guilty and sends him away,the way one might banish a naughty child picking flowers in one's garden:"Do up your jacket and be off." Of courseRoman discovers her betrayal and wants to die, riding his little bicycle off a cliff, its wheels spinning back and forth,like the legs of a cartoon character, say Wile E. Coyote,trying to stop himself in mid-air after he sails off another cliff.Of course he doesn't die. Of coursewhen he calls Hanka from the hospital, the telephonein their apartment just rings and ringsbecause Hanka's afraid to answer. Of courseshe picks it up weeping, whispers, "God, are you ther

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Leafing

By Susan Wood

(From The Decalogue, IX) Because Kieslowski's subject is the enduring power of love,of course when Roman discovers his impotency is permanent and suggeststo Hanka that she divorce him, she says […]

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