Spring 2003 • Vol. XXV No. 2 Book Reviews |

From Revolution to Canon

The Norton Anthology of Theory and Criticism, Edited by Vincent Leitch, William E. Cain, Laurie A. Finke, Barbara E. Johnson, John McGowan, and Jeffrey J. Williams. New York: Norton, 2001. 2,600 pp. $67.45. Once so disorienting and subversive, spreading by rumor and smeary Xerox, literary theory rapidly proved to be a stunning institutional success, producing numerous academic stars and their swirling constellations. Among the many other paradoxes surrounding the theory movement of the past generation, two in particular stand out. First, while theory typically represented itself as a force of radical newness deployed against the dead weight of the hierarchies of the past, it insistently sought to establish a genealogy for itself in canonical texts of the classical and modem traditions. And second, even as recent theory promoted uncertainty, instability, and semiotic excess, it organized itself into "schools," "approaches," and "perspectives." To a very great extent, the theory m

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The Goldilocks Formula

By Myles Weber

The Norton Anthology of Theory and Criticism, Edited by Vincent Leitch, William E. Cain, Laurie A. Finke, Barbara E. Johnson, John McGowan, and Jeffrey J. Williams. New York: Norton, 2001. […]

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