Spring 2001 • Vol. XXIII No. 2 Cultures of Creativity: The Centennial Celebration of the Nobel Prizes |

Prelude to Discovery

Some of the factors which characterise an environment conducive to fruitful and innovative scientific research are rather obvious: freedom and encouragement for individuals who wish to follow new leads spurred by their own curiosity, lively interactions within the group to test out new ideas, the courage to abandon fashionable theories and paradigms, and, of course, the provision of adequate resources for the necessary work. When it comes to the creativity of individuals, the situation is more complex and generalisations are harder to make. We physicists view the physical world in rather different ways, which probably result from genetic rather than environmental factors. Some have mental images which seem to be largely mathematical. Not being one of these, I should speak with caution, but they appear to consider reality as a set of equations. Others think in terms of physical models, picturing what goes on prior to any mathematical analysis, and the differences can be manifested ea

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Desfina: An Chailleach Feasa

By Seamus Heaney

Some of the factors which characterise an environment conducive to fruitful and innovative scientific research are rather obvious: freedom and encouragement for individuals who wish to follow new leads spurred […]

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