Spring 2001 • Vol. XXIII No. 2 Editor's Notes |

Editors’ Notes

Creativity—the drive to generate something new from the materials about us or from the materials within our own imagination, to discover what we didn't know or couldn't see or simply failed to comprehend—this is a defining characteristic of the human being across time and space. Whether we account for it in Freudian terms of transmuted desires or as an expression of cultural expectations or as an existential defiance in the face of an indifferent cosmos, the creative urge is finally nothing less than an articulation of life. For one hundred years, the Nobel Prizes have honored men and women for internationally significant achievements—creative achievements—in literature, the sciences, and in the pursuit of peace. In celebrating the centenary of these distinguished prizes, it seems only appropriate, therefore, that this collaborative issue of two literary magazines, The Kenyon Review (U.S.A.) and Stand (U.K.), in association with the new Nobel Museum in Stockholm, should

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Michael Hulse is celebrated for his poetry, his translations of Sebald, Goethe, Rilke and other German writers, and his editorial work, recently The Twentieth Century in Poetry (Pegasus Press, 2012). His new collection of poems, Half-Life, appears in September.
John Kinsella
John Kinsella's recent books of poetry include Firebreaks (WW Norton, 2016), Jam Tree Gully (WW Norton, 2012) which won the Australian Prime Minister's Award for Poetry and the Judith Wright Calanthe Award, and Sack (Picador, UK, 2014). He is an Extraordinary Fellow of Churchill College, Cambridge University and Professor of Literature and Environment at Curtin University.
Photo of David Lynn
David H. Lynn is the editor emeritus of The Kenyon Review, a professor of English, and special assistant to the president of the college. He was the editor of the Review from 1994 to 2020. As an author, he received a 2016 O. Henry Award for "Divergence." His latest collection, Children of God: New & Selected Stories, was published in 2019 by Braddock Avenue Books.

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Editor’s Notes

By David H. Lynn

Creativity—the drive to generate something new from the materials about us or from the materials within our own imagination, to discover what we didn't know or couldn't see or simply […]

Editor’s Notes

By David H. Lynn

Creativity—the drive to generate something new from the materials about us or from the materials within our own imagination, to discover what we didn't know or couldn't see or simply […]

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