Spring 1998 • Vol. XX No. 2 PoetryApril 1, 1998 |

Measures

I knew a woman who wouldn't trust a man who wouldn't eat zucchini plain-- something about simplicity, readiness to live far down the line from blood and thundering. The oddest measures have ways of ensuring truth is wrung from complexity, she said. No lies with zucchini, she said. And no preening. No murders. Her angora, purring, would sprawl its silken fur across us both, limply chest on my thigh, belly on hers. In all the muscles, such serenity. Bobcat, lynx, cougar, lion-- all, of course, were kitten once, she said. That's given. And a man's eye when he sees them, or hears that word--she'd know him then.

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Stephen Corey has published nine collections of poems, most recently There Is No Finished World (White Pine Press, 2003). He has co-edited four books in three genres, and he has been with The Georgia Review since 1983, where he is currently serving as editor--and, as of 2014, editor of the new Georgia Review book series under the auspices of the University of Georgia Press. His poems, essays, and reviews have appeared in many periodicals, among them Shenandoah, The American Poetry Review, Poets & Writers, and the Kenyon Review. Corey has taught at the University of Florida, where he also earned his PhD in English, and at the University of South Carolina, and he has served as poet-in-residence or visiting poet/editor for a number of conferences and writing programs across the United States.

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