Spring 1997 • Vol. XIX No. 2 Poetry |

Lo, a tint cashmere! / Lo, a Rose!

―Emily Dickinson     I There was another summer: we were listening to Radio Kashmir: the bell announced that second of the sunset: we broke our fasts: then a song: Now again, summer: a summer of the last Yes: we are in the verandah, listening: on Radio Kashmir, a song: "What can one surrender but the heart? / I yield my remaining years to you." She is still somehow holding the world together: she is naming the roses: God loves me, no, He's in love with me, He is a jealous God, He can't bear my love for you, and you are my favorite grandchild. My poet grandson, why don't you write of love? She is reliving with me her dream within a dream within a dream: the mirrors compete for her reflection: I see her with endless arms: I see her without beginning middle or end: it is the last summer of peace: it is the last summer of the last Yes: we are still somehow holding the world together: we are naming the roses: she lifts her lines of Fate and Life and Heart a

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Agha Shahid Ali (1949-2001) was a poet and teacher. He authored a variety of collections including A Walk Through the Yellow Pages (1987), The Half-Inch Himalayas (1987), A Nostalgist’s Map of America (1991), The Country Without a Post Office (1997). His collection, Rooms Are Never Finished (2001) was a finalist for the National Book Award in 2001. He taught at the University of Massachusetts-Amherst, Princeton College, and in the MFA program at Warren Wilson College.

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Farewell

By Agha Shahid Ali

―Emily Dickinson     I There was another summer: we were listening to Radio Kashmir: the bell announced that second of the sunset: we broke our fasts: then a song: Now […]

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