Spring 1996 • Vol. XVIII No. 2 Editor's NotesApril 1, 1996 |

Editor’s Notes

Henry James excepted, writers have often remarked that they discover their stories as they tell them—that fiction and poetry develop a momentum apparently of their own and lead into unexpected territory. The author must have the trust and perhaps the courage to let the tale or poem go. The release may spark its life. General issues of literary magazines, of course, work neither according to the principles of narrative nor of poetic forms. But form of some sort they must take on, and an editor, this editor, may very well experience the surprise and discovery of where apparently unconnected choices have led. Felicitously, for example, this issue of KR has developed a thematic "collage" on mid and later life. Beyond that, we discover clusters of pieces on jazz, on abundance and feasting, probably on other issues too, that, so far, have escaped the editorial eye. Because finally, discovery belongs to the reader, who joins the journey where author and editor have left off and car

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Photo of David Lynn
David H. Lynn is the editor emeritus of The Kenyon Review, a professor of English, and special assistant to the president of the college. He was the editor of the Review from 1994 to 2020. As an author, he received a 2016 O. Henry Award for "Divergence." His latest collection, Children of God: New & Selected Stories, was published in 2019 by Braddock Avenue Books.

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Editor’s Notes

By David H. Lynn

Henry James excepted, writers have often remarked that they discover their stories as they tell them—that fiction and poetry develop a momentum apparently of their own and lead into unexpected […]

Editor’s Notes

By David H. Lynn

Henry James excepted, writers have often remarked that they discover their stories as they tell them—that fiction and poetry develop a momentum apparently of their own and lead into unexpected […]

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