Spring 1995 • Vol. XVII No. 2 Asian-American Literature |

Dreams

He was a man—an ordinary man except for his ability to glean the secrets of life in his dreams. His dreams were as vivid and clear as a river in winter. He had a wife, whom he loved, and he was also considering taking a mistress. There was a pretty young girl, just out of college, who loved to come visit him at his store, Kim's Happy Fruits. When she came in, she bought the same things: a bag of Japanese wasabi-covered roasted peas, a carton of skim milk, exactly one can of Fancy Feast, the store's most expensive brand of cat food. The man decided that she most likely lived alone, with her cat. Perhaps she sold cosmetics—or was one of those types who stood around spraying stinky perfumes at shoppers at Macy's. She was young. Almost young enough to be his daughter, if he had one. "Call me ajushee," he said to her when she came in one day. "What does that mean?" She smiled as she cradled the bag of peas, milk, and cat food in her arms. "You don't speak

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He was a man—an ordinary man except for his ability to glean the secrets of life in his dreams. His dreams were as vivid and clear as a river in […]

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