Spring 1994 • Vol. XVI No. 2 PoetryApril 1, 1994 |

Cravings

Is it not possible that the invalid woman of the 19th century, with her fainting spells, "megrims" and neurasthenia was a victim of low blood sugar, or hypoglycemia? The Mysterious Disease Repeated studies have shown that 80 to 85 per cent of criminal offenders have hypoglycemia. A change to unrefined foods plus vitamin and mineral supplements can effectively reduce re-arrests and improve behavior, morale, mood and self-motivation. Nutrition Almanac When did they ever find the energy to criminally offend? When unravel the winding sheet, the fine suffocation of comforters to a trail of stale clothes on the floor? But every necessary piece is there and it's even worth the dizziness, the thrill of blackout to bend over for them. There's nothing more to do. Food is something you eat to get to sleep. And isn't there something indecent about meals and misdemeanors? If you're lucky, the transportation is yours, or else, dear god, the agony of a phone call to a cab company,

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Churches

By Michael Klein

Is it not possible that the invalid woman of the 19th century, with her fainting spells, "megrims" and neurasthenia was a victim of low blood sugar, or hypoglycemia? The Mysterious […]

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