Spring 1992 • Vol. XIV No. 2 NonfictionApril 1, 1992 |

Lorine Niedecker, the Anonymous: Gender, Class, Genre and Resistances

A poem is a peculiar instance of language's uses, and goes well beyond the [person] writing—finally to the anonymity of any song. ROBERT CREELEY1 Anonymity was a great possession . . . . We can still become anonymous . . . . VIRGINIA WOOLF2 Lorine Niedecker is an American woman poet, born in 1903, who lived most of her sixty-seven years in rural Wisconsin on the confluence of a lake and a river, in a small cabin like those which her father, then she, managed for vacationing fishermen. She was married twice, once very briefly in her late twenties, and then in the last seven years of her life, but she was more deeply marked by her bonds to her parents. She died in 1970. Her life was modest; her poems, mainly, short; her friendships among literary folk—Louis Zukofsky and Cid Corman—and neighbors (Gail and Bonnie Roub) were few, but they nurtured her intent and elegant working in the objectivist poetics within modernism.3 Her work was published only by small press

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Native Fathers

By Jan Clausen

A poem is a peculiar instance of language's uses, and goes well beyond the [person] writing—finally to the anonymity of any song. ROBERT CREELEY1 Anonymity was a great possession . […]

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