Spring 1991 • Vol. XIII No. 2 Poetry |

The Box This Comes In

The box this comes in is not beautiful, at least it is not aggressively beautiful, meaning the workmanship, as it was formerly called--regardless of who took up the tools, but also generally reflecting to whom the tools were entrusted--falls on the faulty side, connoting the work shows: nail heads, blades which slipped past their mark in insuring the fit of the lid, steel screws securing brass hinges, and especially the irregular tooling of the conventionalized flowers. Though the flowers are suggestive of tulips and dogwoods, they are apt to be fleurs-de-lis and marvels-of-Peru. Because the work shows, I favor it more. It likewise follows, lacking mechanical perfection, the box was made by hand. Possibly for someone in particular rather than for sale. If the object was wages not affection, it was nevertheless made with the same two hands; practice rather than mastery guided its making. If true to tradition, the pay would have been unduly low; for motives ruled by affection the

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The Provisional Life

By C. D. Wright

The box this comes in is not beautiful, at least it is not aggressively beautiful, meaning the workmanship, as it was formerly called--regardless of who took up the tools, but […]

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