Spring 1990 • Vol. XII No. 2 |

Tarleton Oak

It was a big tree two hundred and ten years ago when Colonel Tarleton camped beneath it after his seventy-mile ride from Richmond to capture Jefferson and the other rebels who were warned and, in the nick of time, escaped over the Blue Ridge. Since then this oak has stood as a dignified monument to our country's war of liberation: no elaborate statue or marble plinth, just the tree itself and a simple plaque. How charming, in a primitive sort of way, such a monument must seem to Europeans; they'd never tie their glory to the brief lifespan of a living thing. I'm thinking in particular of something I saw last spring in Rome: the column of Marcus Aurelius, erected two thousand years ago to celebrate his victories: a two-hundred-foot pillar of marble made by placing one huge cylinder on top of the other as if they were stacking poker chips or spinal disks from a giant's back. And the whole thing carved in an elaborate bas relief that spiraled upward around the column—the Emperor'

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Bubble Hubbub

By Antler

It was a big tree two hundred and ten years ago when Colonel Tarleton camped beneath it after his seventy-mile ride from Richmond to capture Jefferson and the other rebels […]

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