Spring 1989 • Vol. XI No. 2 Book ReviewsApril 1, 1989 |

The Theorist as the Letter ‘T’

Ariel and the Police: Michel Foucault, William James, Wallace Stevens by Frank Lentricchia. Madison: University of Wisconsin Press, 1988. 259 pp. $22.95. Frank Lentricchia's Ariel and the Police presents itself as a book, and thus invites you to expect the kind of consistency you won't find in it. Consisting largely of work published in the last eight years in Raritan, Cultural Critique, and Critical Inquiry, Ariel and the Police gives us not a considered summary statement from a critic we have come to think of as major (and "representative"?), but rather materials for examining how profoundly divided in mind this critic is on key issues of current literary-theoretical debate—a circumstance the book would better have declared from the outset. Lentricchia's conflictedness of mind involves, most centrally, the problem of "the subject," and it's symptomatic that while Lentricchia's foreword pledges tentative allegiance to this beleaguered notion, his first chapter sneeringly deno

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Twilight of the Idols

By Steven Helmling

Ariel and the Police: Michel Foucault, William James, Wallace Stevens by Frank Lentricchia. Madison: University of Wisconsin Press, 1988. 259 pp. $22.95. Frank Lentricchia's Ariel and the Police presents itself […]

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