Spring 1985 • Vol. VII No. 2 Poetry |

Song from the Watchtower

Say we survive our own exaggerations; say we no longer hope to harness oceans; say the benisons of the porpoise again follow their natural currents and boats cleave again to shallows and poets believe again in water patterns: I and my kind (if there are others) will be forgotten--like all false dates for Armageddon.

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Kay Ryan became the sixteenth Poet Laureate Consultant in Poetry to the Library of Congress in 2008. Raised in the San Joaquin Valley and Mojave Desert, Ryan spent her professional career teaching English at College of Marin in Kentfield, California and writing poems. Her collections have earned numerous awards, including a Ruth Lilly Poetry Prize, a Guggenheim fellowship, a National Endowment for the Arts fellowship and several Pushcart Prizes. Her books include Dragon Acts to Dragon Ends (1983), Strangely Marked Metal (1985), Elephant Rocks (1996) and Say Uncle (2000).

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The Tables Freed

By Kay Ryan

Say we survive our own exaggerations; say we no longer hope to harness oceans; say the benisons of the porpoise again follow their natural currents and boats cleave again to […]

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