Spring 1983 • Vol. V No. 2 Poetry |

Keats and the Elgin Marbles

for Frederick Turner Openings. Winandermere* and Derwentwater. The Elgin Marbles. That last evening at the Crown in Liverpool, with George and his new wife, imagination failed  --and still fails: what can John Keats  have had to do with a hacked clearing  in the Kentucky underbrush? How could  Mnemosyne herself, the mother of the Muse,  have coped with that uncultivated tangle,  catbrier and poison ivy, chiggers,  tent caterpillars, cottonmouths,  the awful gurglings and chirrings  of the dark?         Turning his back against the hemp and tar, the creaking tedium of actual departure, the angry fogs, the lidless ferocity of the Atlantic--epic distances fouled by necessity-- he left them sleeping, George and his Georgiana, so much wrapped up in being newly wed they scarcely knew they had no home now but each other, he took up his pack (a change of clothes, pens, paper, the Divine Comedy in translation--he knew no Italian yet, or Greek) an

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In 1983, at the age of sixty-three, Amy Clampitt published her first full-length collection, The Kingfisher (Alfred A. Knopf). In the decade that followed, Clampitt published five books of poetry, including What the Light Was Like (Alfred A. Knopf, 1985), Archaic Figure (Alfred A. Knopf, 1987), and Westward (Alfred A. Knopf, 1990). Her last book, A Silence Opens (Alfred A. Knopf), appeared in 1994. The recipient in 1982 of a Guggenheim Fellowship, and in 1984 of an Academy Fellowship, she was made a MacArthur Foundation Fellow in 1992.

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