Spring 1980 • Vol. II No. 2 NonfictionApril 1, 1980 |

“The Way I Loved George Eliot”: Friendship with Books as a Neglected Critical Metaphor

. . . I want to be loved. That is even the deep-lying reason why I elected to write. When I was eighteen, I read The Mill on the Floss, and I dreamed that one day I would be loved the way I loved George Eliot then. . . . SIMONE DE BEAUVOIR What does every earnest man seek in the deep instinct of society, from his first fellowship . . . but to find himself in another's mind: because such is the law of his being that only can he find out his own secret through the instrumentality of another mind. We hail with gladness this new acquisition of ourselves. That man I must follow, for he has a part of me; and I follow him that I may acquire myself. The great are our better selves, ourselves with advantages. . . . EMERSON I Most modern critics who have attempted any kind of ethical criticism have sought ways of judging the effects of literary works on the lives of their readers—what modern jargon would call after-effects. Will this book work for good or ill i

Already have an account? Login

Join KR for even more to read.

Register for a free account to read five free pieces a month from our current issue and digital archive.
Register for Free and Read This Piece



Or become a subscriber today and get complete, immediate access to our digital archives at every subscription level.

Read More

One Day

By Wayne C. Booth

. . . I want to be loved. That is even the deep-lying reason why I elected to write. When I was eighteen, I read The Mill on the Floss, […]

Subscribe

Your free registration with Kenyon review incudes access to exclusive content, early access to program registration, and more.

Donate

With your support, we’ll continue 
to cultivate talent and publish extraordinary literature from diverse voices around the world.