Spring 1980 • Vol. II No. 2 PoetryApril 1, 1980 |

Purgation

                      homage, Po Chü-yi   Before and after the eye, grasses go over the long fields.  Every season they walk on              by us, as though I -- no; I and you,    Dear friend -- decreed it. One time or another  They are here. Grass season . . . yet we are no longer the best      Of us. Lie stiller, closer; in the April I love    For its juices, there is too much green for your grave.     I feel that the Spring should ignite with what is  Unnatural as we; ours, but God-suspected. It should come in one                    furious step, and leave Some -- a little -- green for us; never quite get every one of the                 hummocks tremoring vaguely   Tall in the passed-through air. They'd make the old road be    The road for old men, where you and I used to wander tow

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In 1956, James Dickey resigned his teaching position at The University of Florida when his reading of the poem "The Father's Body" to a local women's group was construed as obscene. He took a position as an advertising copywriter and executive for the McCann-Erickson agency in New York, a position he later described as "selling his soul to the devil in the daytime and buying it back at night." Dickey worked in the advertising business until 1961, when he received a Guggenheim Fellowship that allowed him to move his family to Italy and devote his time to writing poetry.

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