Spring 1965 • Vol. XXVII No. 2 Nonfiction |

Hawthorne and 100 Years: A Report from the Academy

As I have said, we are always finding new Hawthornes, but the illusion soon wears away, and then we perceive that… he had some peculiar difference from them. —William Dean Howells, 1900 The great celebrations of literary 1964 are over. And at the rate we are using up the big names we are before long going to run out of people to commemorate, though for now there is Dante (1265-1321), and I suppose Kipling (1865- 1936). Naturally last year belonged to William Shakespeare (1564-1616), and quite a year it was: Festschriften and all sorts of collections; stamps and innumerable new productions and recordings; Sampler Recitals and conferences of dedicated scholars (Crows in the Treetops); exhibitions, touring and stationary; White House performances: you name it. The clearest sign of how things have been going lately in the academies, though, was provided by the publication of Gordon Ross Smith's well-received but also frightening Classified Shakespeare Bibliography, 1936-1958. T

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Our Hemingway Man

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As I have said, we are always finding new Hawthornes, but the illusion soon wears away, and then we perceive that… he had some peculiar difference from them. —William Dean […]

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