Spring 1964 • Vol. XXVI No. 2 Poetry |

Learning by Doing

"constructive technological destructiveness"—Marcuse, Eros & Civilization They're taking down a tree at the front door, The power saw is snarling at some nerves, Whining at others. Now and then it grunts, And sawdust falls like snow or a drift of seeds. Rotten, they tell us, at the fork, and one Big wind would bring it down. So what they do They do, as usual, to do us good. Whatever cannot carry its own weight Has got to go, and so on; you expect To hear them talking next about survival And the values of a free society. For in the explanations people give On these occasions there is generally some Mean-spirited moral point, and everyone Privately wonders if his neighbors plan To saw him up before he falls on them. Maybe a hundred years in sun and shower Dismantled in a morning and let down Out of itself a finger at a time And then an arm, and so down to the trunk, Until there's nothing left to hold on to Or snub the splintery holding rope around, And where those big gree

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To Dante

By Howard Nemerov

"constructive technological destructiveness"—Marcuse, Eros & Civilization They're taking down a tree at the front door, The power saw is snarling at some nerves, Whining at others. Now and then it […]

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